Bing recently made major updates to their social search capability which leverages their relationship with Facebook.  With this latest update, Bing now uses “Likes” from a user’s Facebook Friends, as well as the collective wisdom gained from opinions of users at large, to better rank and present search results.

As reported widely, Bing’s updates also includes the availability of the Bing Bar, which makes it easy for users to Like any page on the Web. This is another source of social signals for Bing. On the heels of this major update to Bing.com, Microsoft has also added social search features to its mobile search as well.

Equally noteworthy has been the aggressive ad campaign around the themes “Bing and decide with your friends“, and “Friends don’t let friends decide alone“.

In the days following these major updates to Bing, there’s been a lot of discussion on the impact of these changes to the search landscape.  Here are a few topics related to this, that interested me greatly:

  • Users seem to like these new social search features in general. But is this enough to convert regular Google search users to Bing?  This is covered in a good post at Brafton.com.
  • All these social search additions from Bing (and earlier from Google) are changing the nature of search itself. The social impact on search was a hot topic at SEMPO, and that is covered well at this post from SearchAdvisory.net.
  • So, who is creating the most social search engine now?  Google or Bing?  This is a topic covered in this post, also from SearchAdvisory.net.
  • Twitter is impacting Web search results.  Facebook is altering Web search results.  Other social signals are increasingly changing the search results we see from Google and Bing. SearchEngineWatch has a collection of posts on this page related to this topic of how social signals are impacting mainstream Web search engines.
  • With Bing’s aggressive integration of social search, comes the natural question around the impact of the Facebook-Microsoft alliance on Google.  This AdAge article calls out why Microsoft’s Facebook alliance is a real threat to Google.

In my blog post on The Evolution of Social Search, I predicted that “Social Search, as we now know it, becomes a mainstream search engine feature”. Bing’s recent social search moves seem to cement that claim.

The current wave of “social search” has been around the concept of using social signals of recommendation from friends and the Web at large to alter the rank ordering and presentation of Web search results.  Good strides have been made in this regard, and I expect even more activity and integration from Google and Bing in the coming months.

My startup, Zakta, has taken the next steps in deepening social search.  Where the current generation of social search involves leveraging signals of recommendation from friends / social connections in presenting Web search results, SearchTeam.com from Zakta enables users to search the Web together with their friends and other trusted people.  SearchTeam provides the capability for friends to search together, classmates to research together, for colleagues to work together, in real-time or asynchronously, curating the best search results together from the Web.

Just as the current generation of social search features promises to improve the quality of search results for transactional searches and some simple informational searches by leveraging social signals, SearchTeam delivers the social search solution for improving the quality and experience and value of deeper informational searches through its collaborative search and curation paradigm.

What is your take on social search and its long term impact on the search landscape?

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