Does the Web need Collaborative Search Tools?

Search engine interfaces have historically been designed to let just an individual search the Web for their needs.  In over 15 years since the first Web search engine hit the market, search engine use has become ubiquitous, with many searches actually being collaborative in nature. But search engines have remained in the domain for individual use only.  Why are search engines designed only to be used alone?

Before answering this, I think it is useful to see if search engines really are being used collaboratively today? Let us look at one example in a bit of detail

Planning a vacation with friends / family: Whether it is spring break with friends, or a summer vacation with family, vacation planning involved web searching and communication, coordination and collaboration with friends or family members. When my family went on a summer vacation to Toronto, Canada recently, I had to engage my family members in the process, seeking input about places to go, places to stay, and myriad other details. Here’s how I ended up doing this job:

  • Suffering from Google addiction as many out there are, I googled many times to find interesting information about places in and around Toronto, day trips of interest, interesting places to stay etc.
  • I copied links of interest over into my email and pruned that list and would periodically pass it around for comments from the family
  • I visited many different specialty sites like Expedia, Travelocity, Hotels.com, Priceline, Kayak etc. to find possible flight itineraries, and places to stay
  • And in turn, I copied interesting links of places to stay, as well as possible travel itineraries, in email and sent that around for comments from the family
  • My wife or son would pass along interesting links via email along the way from some searches they did, or tidbits they heard from other family members / friends who had been to Toronto before.  Some more conversations would ensue.
  • Many iterations of this, and many email conversations and many in-person conversations (where that was possible) later, many days from when we started this process, we arrived at the decisions we needed.  We had firmed up an itinerary, places to stay, details of places to see, day trips to try out, and lists of links of interest towards our visit (all scattered across multiple emails).

Does this sound familiar?  This is collaborative searching at work.  Albeit with search engines that weren’t built to support it.

Let’s look at another example in a little detail.

Researching a disease or medical condition: It is not uncommon these days to have a good friend or a family member get diagnosed with some new disease or medical condition. That kicks off the process of trying to learn more about the disease or condition, finding treatment options, and finding ways to cope with the condition.  Recently, in my family, a relative of mine was diagnosed recently with high cholesterol and diabetes at the same time. They reached out to me for input on food or lifestyle changes that might help with the management of the diseases along with their regular mainstream treatment. They were keen to know about herbs or supplements that might help, or how methods like Yoga or energy healing might contribute towards a return to wellness faster.  The process that ensued was like this:

  • I googled many different queries related to these conditions, and additional queries related to diet, nutrition, supplements / herbs, lifestyle changes, looking for good authoritative information that I could pass along
  • I started collecting links into an email and sent them along in small batches to my relative
  • In turn, I’d get emails back with links and questions about the legitimacy / believability of various claims made about certain supplements or herbs.  And I’d check them out to see the sources and citations and so forth and write back about each
  • Occasionally, they would find me online on Skype and reach out to me to chat about some additional things they had read.  In the process, we’d discover some more interesting resources to keep for future use, which I’d go copy into an open email or new email
  • Dozens of queries, hundreds of pages sifted, and many email threads later, we had collected dozens of links of use for my relative. They finally had the information they needed to make their own decision in concert with their doctor

Sound familiar again?  This too is an example of collaborative search in action today.

The problem with this is that, this process is inefficient, time consuming, prone to redundant work (people doing the same queries, seeing the same sites that were not useful etc.), and at the end of all this, the useful information is spread across multiple emails and possibly some instant messaging / chat sessions, and not easily discoverable or usable when you need to consult it later on.

Here are more examples at home or in other personal contexts, where I’ve run into this need:  Shopping for an appliance or a big ticket item;  Looking for a new home; Finding suppliers for a craft project;  Finding learning resources for gifted kids etc.

Plenty of such examples also exist in the academic context or business context as well.

What is common across all of these examples is that there’s more than one person involved in the finding, collecting, organizing, sharing or using of that information.  i.e. These are prime examples of collaborative searching, which cry out for a new breed of collaborative search tools.

So, yes, I think that the Web needs collaborative search tools now.  What do you think?

My startup Zakta, is about to launch SearchTeam (sometimes mistakenly referred to as Search Team), a real time collaborative search and curation engine.  It combines traditional search engine features, with semantics, curation tools, real-time and asynchronous collaboration tools to deliver the world’s first commercial tool for real-time collaborative searching with trusted people.  SearchTeam is designed from ground up to enable users to search the Web together with others they trust, curating, sharing and collaborating on what they need on any given topic.  I’ll be sharing more information about this in the coming days and weeks.

The Buzz about Google’s Search Quality

We may have reached a tipping point in our tolerance of the declining quality of web search results on Google. At least that is how it appears with the growing commentary on the subject from influential bloggers, writers in the news media and searchers as well.

A meme in the making?

Anil Dash writes about the decline of Google search quality citing the negative experiences and observations of Paul Kedrosky, Alan Patrick, and Jeff Atwood:

What is worth noting now is that, half a decade after so many people began unquestioningly modifying their sites to serve Google’s needs better, there may start to be enough critical mass for the pendulum to swing back to earlier days, when Google modified its workings to suit the web’s existing behaviors.

Many more bloggers are chiming in about the same matter, as this BlogPulse Conversation Tracker listing shows.

Meanwhile, at LifeHacker, over 77% of readers say that Google’s search results are less useful lately:

We asked readers last week whether what influential bloggers said was true—that Google was losing the war against search result spam. Your response? More than three quarters found Google prone to spam, with one-third tagging the decline as significant.

Michael Rosenwald wrote in the Washington post about the losing battle against spam in search results:

Google’s success rate, as measured by the percentage of users visiting a Web site after executing a search, fell 13 percent last year, according to Experian Hitwise, which monitors Web traffic. Microsoft’s Bing search engine increased its search efficiency by 9 percent over the same period.

Although there could be several reasons for the disparity, one is most certainly spam in Google’s results, analysts said.

“It’s clear that Google is losing some kind of war with the spammers,” said tech guru Tim O’Reilly, who often cheers Google’s technology. “I think Google has in some ways taken their eye off the ball, and I’d be worried about it if I were them.”

For years, Google’s organic search results have been experiencing a slow decline in quality. Paul Kedrosky writes about this in a recent blog post:

What has happened is that Google’s ranking algorithm, like any trading algorithm, has lost its alpha. It no longer has lists to draw and, on its own, it no longer generates the same outperformance — in part because it is, for practical purposes, reverse-engineered, well-understood and operating in an adaptive content landscape. Search results in many categories are now honey pots embedded in ruined landscapes — traps for the unwary. It has turned search back into something like it was in the dying days of first-generation algorithmic search, like Excite and Altavista: results so polluted by spam that you often started looking at results only on the second or third page — the first page was a smoking hulk of algo-optimized awfulness.

Would Google care?

One thing I personally do wonder about is just how important is this issue to Google in 2011 and beyond, as compared to when they started in 1999!  In my earlier post on this blog, I wrote about the ongoing relevance of search relevance to Google:

I have no doubt that Google’s relevance with organic search results will improve yet again, given the rise in negative commentary about it in influential pockets of the Internet.  However, the pertinent question to ask is this: Why would an advertising giant care more about relevance of organic search results any more than absolutely necessary to keep their revenue proposition in tact?  Or, asked another way, is search relevance ever likely to be as relevant as ad relevance to Google?

Should Google care?

What is the practical threat to Google? It seems that all this isn’t really affecting Google’s stable search market share or its growing ad revenues in any meaningful way! But there are others who see 2011 as a turning point for Google’s invincibility.

Niall Harbison wrote recently about the perfect storm coming together to unhinge Google, that too in 2011.  He cites real time search, friend recommendations, the Like button from Facebook, the rise of spam, the possibility of categorized human knowledge and Bing as some of the key factors that could unseat Google as the search king.:

For years it seemed as if Google could do no wrong and the competition be it search start ups, Yahoo or Microsoft was generally batted away with disdain. The landscape has changed over the last 18 months though and Google faces a very real danger that it’s core product could come under threat and I think 2011 will be the year where we see the first cracks start to appear in Google’s once invincible search armor.

I am not ready to predict anything about Google’s future.  I myself have been a Google addict, and I respect their talent and innovations to date greatly.  I am interested in all this in a very deep and personal way.  I been in the search engine space, dabbling with search engine technologies since 1996. But more importantly, my startup, Zakta is set to introduce an innovative search tool that we hope is very relevant to the problems we face with search today, and very useful as well.  SearchTeam.com is in private beta now, and offers unique ways to search the Web, curate what you need, personally or in collaboration with others you trust.

What is your take on this?

Better late than never

Hello world!  Welcome to The Sharer blog.  My name is Sundar Kadayam, a technology entrepreneur, with over 24 years of experience in the software industry.

Writing this first personal blog post at Kadayam.com, I feel so much like a latecomer to a revolution that has been underway for almost 8-10 years.  100s millions of blogs and personal journals, 600M-700M users in social networks, billions of tweets and more later, does the world need another blog?  Really what is the use of another pile of opinions, another addition to the ranks of self-important megaphone wielders?

I did not take these questions lightly. It is true that I’m a Johnny-come-lately to the online world of social media and social networks.  But that is only partly true.

My professional journey had me leading teams of people measuring and monitoring the social media revolution from a time before it was called “social media”, a journey that left me with no time or energy to devote to being on the front lines wielding my own megaphone.

At the same time, I’ve been on an incredible personal journey that has brought greater clarity, healing and incredible moments of awakening.

The problem with blogging for me is that I’ve never been fond of the idea of wielding a megaphone – there’s enough noise out there already, and the world doesn’t need me to add to that noise in any way.  Will I have something useful to say?  Why should anyone care?

But then, despite my reticence to start blogging, I’ve found that people have enjoyed hearing me share my stories, experiences and tidbits from life.

Finally, the resolution to this dilemma came from a dear friend and mentor. He assuaged my doubts about the value I can deliver and pointed out just how sharing came naturally to me.

And so, and here I am, deciding to honor the sharer in me, through this blog, The Sharer, where I plan to share tidbits of learning from the experiences of my life.

Let me get started with a few things right away …

Since 1996, I’ve worked with search engine technologies and it has been an area of passion for me.  In fact, as I write this, at my current startup, Zakta, we are running a private beta of the world’s first real-time collaborative search engine.  It enables friends, classmates, colleagues or other trusted people to search together in real-time.

Another area of passion for me has been entrepreneurship.  Given my background and upbringing, I am an unlikely entrepreneur! My entrepreneurial journey has been fascinating and full of personal learning so far, and I hope to share some of that too here!

I’m also fascinated with topics related to health, wellness, healing and the deeper aspects of life and living itself.  I do healing work, and have been doing so for almost 10 years now. That has opened up a view of the fabric of life itself that has changed me deeply and permanently in the way I relate to people and the world around me.  I hope to share some of these life changing experiences here as well.

There … I’ve gotten started!  I think I can do this – be The Sharer!  And as they say, “better late than never”!

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