The Social Search Buzz Dance

Today I was looking at the recent trend in social media buzz about “social search”.  I saw something that was interesting to my eye.

Social buzz on "social search"

The blue line in this graph is the overall mentions of the phrase “social search” in all blogs tracked by BlogPulse.com

The orange line is the portion of mentions of the phrase “social search” and Google.

The green line is the portion of mentions of the phrase “social search” and either Microsoft or Bing.

I noticed a few things:

  1. The buzz in blogs about “social search” overall tracks closely to work done by Google or Microsoft in that area.
  2. The spikes in buzz are usually related to some news or announcement from one of these companies.
  3. The spike in buzz on Jul 15th is related to an accidental reveal of an internal social search engine research project at Microsoft (first discovered by Fusible, and then picked up by Search Engine Land, and covered in many outlets including here at Bing Watch and Microsoft-Watch).

There are a lot of startups and other entrepeneurs working on social search related technologies and services.  Do these generate any buzz at all in social media?

Social media buzz on "Social search" - buzz generated about something other than Microsoft's or Google's work

In this trend graph above, the blue line is the same as with the first trend graph on top, and the orange line is buzz about “social search” that does not mention Google, Microsoft or Bing.

There’s a trickle of non-Google, non-Microsoft buzz regarding “social search”.

But the overall public discourse on “social search”, the social search buzz dance if you will, is dominated by Google and Microsoft.  I see this as further evidence that “social search” as we are currently viewing it in the market will be mainstream search engine features, as I wrote about it in this post on The Evolution of Social Search.

In related news, my startup Zakta, officially announced the public availability of SearchTeam.com, the world’s first real-time collaborative search and curation engine.  It is the first search engine on the Web to allows friends, classmates, family members, colleagues and other trusted people to search together and find and share what they need.

Here is a (~1 minute) concept video that shows the idea behind SearchTeam:

Here is a (~ 3 minute) guided tour video of the capabilities of SearchTeam:

For those of you who prefer to browse through a set of screenshots at your pace, rather than watch the videos, here’s a pdf file with annotated screenshots of SearchTeam.com.

Early reviews have been quite positive, with promising applications of SearchTeam in School, at Home and at Work.  I’d like to personally extend my gratitude to all of you who have tweeted, blogged or otherwise shared SearchTeam with your social circles.  Innovation like SearchTeam can thrive only through the support of people like you.  Thank you for your support!

Social Search and Bing

Bing recently made major updates to their social search capability which leverages their relationship with Facebook.  With this latest update, Bing now uses “Likes” from a user’s Facebook Friends, as well as the collective wisdom gained from opinions of users at large, to better rank and present search results.

As reported widely, Bing’s updates also includes the availability of the Bing Bar, which makes it easy for users to Like any page on the Web. This is another source of social signals for Bing. On the heels of this major update to Bing.com, Microsoft has also added social search features to its mobile search as well.

Equally noteworthy has been the aggressive ad campaign around the themes “Bing and decide with your friends“, and “Friends don’t let friends decide alone“.

In the days following these major updates to Bing, there’s been a lot of discussion on the impact of these changes to the search landscape.  Here are a few topics related to this, that interested me greatly:

  • Users seem to like these new social search features in general. But is this enough to convert regular Google search users to Bing?  This is covered in a good post at Brafton.com.
  • All these social search additions from Bing (and earlier from Google) are changing the nature of search itself. The social impact on search was a hot topic at SEMPO, and that is covered well at this post from SearchAdvisory.net.
  • So, who is creating the most social search engine now?  Google or Bing?  This is a topic covered in this post, also from SearchAdvisory.net.
  • Twitter is impacting Web search results.  Facebook is altering Web search results.  Other social signals are increasingly changing the search results we see from Google and Bing. SearchEngineWatch has a collection of posts on this page related to this topic of how social signals are impacting mainstream Web search engines.
  • With Bing’s aggressive integration of social search, comes the natural question around the impact of the Facebook-Microsoft alliance on Google.  This AdAge article calls out why Microsoft’s Facebook alliance is a real threat to Google.

In my blog post on The Evolution of Social Search, I predicted that “Social Search, as we now know it, becomes a mainstream search engine feature”. Bing’s recent social search moves seem to cement that claim.

The current wave of “social search” has been around the concept of using social signals of recommendation from friends and the Web at large to alter the rank ordering and presentation of Web search results.  Good strides have been made in this regard, and I expect even more activity and integration from Google and Bing in the coming months.

My startup, Zakta, has taken the next steps in deepening social search.  Where the current generation of social search involves leveraging signals of recommendation from friends / social connections in presenting Web search results, SearchTeam.com from Zakta enables users to search the Web together with their friends and other trusted people.  SearchTeam provides the capability for friends to search together, classmates to research together, for colleagues to work together, in real-time or asynchronously, curating the best search results together from the Web.

Just as the current generation of social search features promises to improve the quality of search results for transactional searches and some simple informational searches by leveraging social signals, SearchTeam delivers the social search solution for improving the quality and experience and value of deeper informational searches through its collaborative search and curation paradigm.

What is your take on social search and its long term impact on the search landscape?

Is Google domination stifling search engine innovation?

Google is the undisputed leader in the search engine market.

US Search Engines Marketshare, 6-month trend from StatOwlSource: StatOwl

As this trend chart shows, in the past few months, Google has lost a little bit of ground to Bing and Yahoo.  And that is after a mega spend on the Bing launch and the Yahoo-Microsoft deal.

For me, this is not the noteworthy observation in this chart.  It is that the “Other” group charted here is only 0.02% or lesser of marketshare / usage!

And this is particularly interesting when you consider that there has been a continuous stream of well-funded search engine companies that have come into the market over time.  Take the well funded and much-hyped Cuil or the recently launched Blekko.  Or the veteran meta search engine DogPile. Or the clustering search engine Clusty. Or niche search engines like the discussion search engine Omgili, or the people search engine Pipl, or the real-time search engine Topsy.  There are literally over one hundred such search engines in existence now, not to mention the many that have come and gone!

The combined effect of all the $s gone into these companies, their creativity, their innovations, as measured by their actual impact on the market is but a small, unnoticeable blip.

The dominance of Google, with Bing, Yahoo, AOL and Ask picking up the rear to complete the canvas of “mainstream search engines”, seems to leave no room whatsoever for innovations from outside to thrive!

One could argue that none of the hundreds of search engine companies in the past decade offered a compelling enough alternative to Google.  Clearly that is true at many levels.  The sheer coverage of the Web that Google provides, the high performance sub-second result pages, the continuous stream of small innovations (like Wonder Wheel, Query Autosuggestions, Google Instant etc.) continue to keep a high bar that not even the others in the “mainstream search engines” have been able to match and exceed consistently.

On the other hand, Google isn’t without flaws, holes and deficiencies.  As recent articles point out well, Google’s search results are manipulated every single minute.  What yielded superior results consistently back in 1999-2001 has consistently been compromised in the past 8-9 years, especially for queries with a commercial intent.  Relevance, the thing that Google was originally most famous for, is slipping away from Google, or so it seems at this juncture.  This, and other factors like, the growth of social media, social networking, real-time information, video and more, have made the search engine problem more complex.  In this complexity, and these gaps, search engine startups see opportunities, and investors continue to invest money.

But will any of these search engine startups and their innovations really become part of the mainstream in terms of user adoption?

It does seem like a tall order.  The graph above speaks volumes about the rather poor odds of a new search engine become part of the mainstream!   It is in this vein that I wonder if Google’s domination, followed by the four other “mainstream search engines”, stifles lasting search engine innovation from a broader market of search engine companies!  What do you think?

I have a vested interest in this matter.  My second startup, Zakta, is about to release a new search engine to market soon.  I’ll be writing more about this here in the coming days and weeks.

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